Last Updated on August 21, 2015 by Alberto Molero

Getting to Bazaruto Island, Mozambique, was an experience on its own. Onboard a light aircraft, we flew over the spearmint blue water off the sparkling coast of Vilanculos, past hundreds of submerged atolls, to get to Indigo Bay. The sea was painted in striated strokes of beige and white, with subtle hints of sand dunes dancing beneath the water surface.

Tiny sailboats looked like little lego pieces lost in the vast sea of blue. Patchworks of islands were scattered throughout the sea and clusters of seaweeds sprinkled along the light beige seabed resembled polka dots on a table cloth. These sand formations were naturally created by the warm, southward-flowing Mozambique Current – but from above, they looked like the work of an artist.

Some say, the journey itself is often more important than the destination. In this case, I can’t agree more. Words don’t do the Mozambique coastline any justice – I’ll let Alberto’s photos do the talking. Enjoy the play of colors!

Sailboats lost in the sea

Sailboats lost in the sea of blue

A sailboat in the turquoise sea

Cruising over underwater sand dunes

Sand dunes beneath the water

Folds of sand beneath the water formed by the warm Mozambique Current

Sand dunes on Bazaruto

Mountains of Gold: Sand dunes on Bazaruto Island

Closer to the sea

A lonesome sail boat drifting in the shallow waters

A hundred shades of blue

A hundred shades of blue splashed across the sea

Polka dots in the sea

Clusters of seaweeds resemble polka dots on a blue silky cloth

A dolphin-shaped island

A dolphin-shaped island off the coast

Arriving on Bazaruto island

Closing in on Bazaruto Island

Near Vilanculos, mainland Mozambique

 Over the town of Vilanculos

Vilanculos coastline

 Reaching mainland Mozambique – where the waters off the coast are clear as glass


Disclaimer: Our trip to Mozambique was made possible by Indigo Bay (Rani Resorts) and Nicky Arthur PR, but as always, all opinions expressed above are our own.

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