Wild Junket » Egypt http://www.wildjunket.com An adventure travel blog that brings you on a rollercoaster ride around the world Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:30:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Gastronomic Travel: Street Food in Turkey and Egypt http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/08/10/gastronomic-travel-street-food-in-turkey-and-egypt/ http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/08/10/gastronomic-travel-street-food-in-turkey-and-egypt/#comments Tue, 10 Aug 2010 07:32:11 +0000 http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/08/10/gastronomic-travel-street-food-in-turkey-and-egypt/ Colorful spices in IstanbulWhile I’m out and about exploring India, this week’s guest post features the nearby shores of Egypt and Turkey. The Egypt Holidays team at Travel Supermarket brings us on a culinary tour through the street food culture and vibrant market scene of these two destinations. Although I’ve visited both countries on different occasions and scoured [...]

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While I’m out and about exploring India, this week’s guest post features the nearby shores of Egypt and Turkey. The Egypt Holidays team at Travel Supermarket brings us on a culinary tour through the street food culture and vibrant market scene of these two destinations.

Although I’ve visited both countries on different occasions and scoured their food markets, I’m no expert at Turkish and Egyptian cuisine. So if you’re as much of a foodie as I am, read more to find out these destinations’ essential eats and local fare and you’ll find yourself digging deeper into their world.

Colorful spices in Istanbul's food market

Where to Find Authentic Food in Turkey and Egypt

Take a stroll through a bustling marketplace during your Egyptian or Turkish holiday and you’ll be met with the smell of aromatic spices and freshly grilled meats from stalls, as well as the sounds of street hawkers trying to persuade you to purchase a portion of their delicious delicacies.

Throughout Turkey and Egypt you’ll find street carts selling a variety of delicious tidbits that you can enjoy as you peruse for a bargain or take in the sights, sounds and smells of a marketplace. These small meals are very affordable, so won’t break into your budget too much while you’re on your travels, and can help to fill you up for a day’s exploration.

Street food stall

Quintessential Egyptian Dish: Fuul

Egyptian cuisine tends to include a lot of vegetables and pulses, including chickpeas, which form the basis for one of the national dishes. Fuul is a dish of fava beans that have been cooked, crushed and mixed with onion, garlic, parsley, lemon juice and lashings of olive oil. Often served as a breakfast dish with lots of bread as an accompaniment, it can be a great way of fuelling up for a day of exploring the Pyramids.

Ta'amiya frying Photo by khowaga1

Turkish Breakfast: Kahvalti

In contrast, breakfast in Turkey is known as ‘kahvalti’ – meaning ‘before coffee’ – and consists of a serving of strong black tea that is usually served with simit, a ring of bread that has been sprinkled with sesame seeds. Breakfast accompaniments can also include boiled eggs, melon, olives, spicy sausages (sucuk) and spicy cheese (cokelek).

Spicy Meatballs: Koftes

Koftes are a popular foodstuff that can be found on many a street cart in both countries. These spicy lamb meatballs are usually served with copious amounts of bread and cooling mint yoghurt, helping you to cool your palette of the onion and chilli flavors that add to the flavor.

Meatballs or Kofte

Kebab stand Most Popular Dish: Falafel & Kebabs

A favorite street food in Egypt is falafel, which consists of croquettes of a paste made from chickpeas and fava beans which have been blended with various spices. These are usually served in a pita bread with salad, pickled vegetables and a hummus-style sauce. This quick and wholesome vegetarian option is available for as little as 70p

For something meatier, both countries have a delicious selection of freshly grilled kebabs available, giving you the chance to pick up a filling shish kebab with all the trimmings for around £1.30

Egypt’s Classic Hawker Food: Koshari

For something more filling at lunchtime, the hearty Koshari (often spelt Kushuri) is one of the classic street hawker dishes of Egypt. Consisting of a mixture of chickpeas, lentils and a spiced tomato sauce served over pasta, this hearty dish will help to fill you up during lunchtime, the dish is very cheap and you’d be unlucky to pay any more than around £1.50 for a decent portion.

Turkish Staple Food: Pilav

In Turkey, pilav is another hearty dish that can help to sustain you until dinner time. Pilav is made using a mixture of spiced rice and added ingredients that differ from place to place, including meat and vegetable. So, if you’re feeling experimental there are plenty of variations of this dish for you to try. Pilav is a staple food that is a favourite for street chefs, so finding a portion shouldn’t be too difficult whilst you’re on your travels.

Pilav rice with condiments

Exotic Fare: Kokorec

If you have the stomach for it, there are some more unusual dishes available from street stalls, such as Kokorec, which consists of lamb or goat meat, spiced heavily and wrapped in intestine – most likely to disguise the taste. In the Aegean region of Turkey is another unusual street food of Kelle Sogus, made using various parts of sheep offal, marinated in oil and often served with lavas bread.

2463433491_148e36fa84_z Photo by auselen

Street hawkers can provide you with the opportunity to try exciting new dishes during your travels, and Egyptian and Turkish marketplaces certainly have a lot of foodstuffs to choose from and to enjoy, so be a little experimental in your travel eating!

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World’s Top 8 Scuba Diving Destinations http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/06/19/worlds-top-8-scuba-diving-destinations/ http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/06/19/worlds-top-8-scuba-diving-destinations/#comments Sat, 19 Jun 2010 08:16:00 +0000 http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/06/19/worlds-top-8-scuba-diving-destinations/ 4020596366_b2eb868075Gliding past rainbow-colored corals and swimming alongside giant manta rays and languid turtles: scuba diving gives us a chance to acquaint with the deep realms of nature. In this world where nature is overrun by tourism, scuba-diving provides that rare peek into a different galaxy. Whether you are a novice to the scuba diving world [...]

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Gliding past rainbow-colored corals and swimming alongside giant manta rays and languid turtles: scuba diving gives us a chance to acquaint with the deep realms of nature. In this world where nature is overrun by tourism, scuba-diving provides that rare peek into a different galaxy. Whether you are a novice to the scuba diving world or an expert, my compiled list of the best places to scuba dive will leave you craving for some bubbling action.

1. Great Barrier Reef, Australia

A quintessential part of most Queensland holidays is a plunge into the world’s biggest coral reef. The Great Barrier Reef is teeming with thousands of species of marine life, a massive area of multi-hued coral reefs and miles and miles of turquoise waters. But the barrier reef is shrinking thanks to human interference, so make sure you get there during your Australia holidays in 2010!

4020596366_b2eb868075 Flickr photo by brewbooks

2. Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula is studded with freshwater underwater caves called cenotes – an intriguing natural phenomenon that makes for an extraordinary diving experience. One of the best known is the 48-foot-deep Cenote Taj Maja, just south of the Caribbean coastal town of Playa del Carmen. Its 60-foot-wide sinkhole is made up of an immense network of underwater stalagmites and stalactite in the extremely calm and clear freshwaters.

2286204882_c53a19af32 Flickr photo by Lance Gardner

3. The Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Undoubtedly one of my favorite spots in the world, the Galapagos is teeming with some of the world’s most unique wildlife, be it on land or underwater. Gordon Rocks is an excellent dive site for spotting schools of hammerhead sharks and torpedoes of barracudas. Mingle with the playful sea lions or swim with the penguins – there are tons of aquatic life to see here!

2685788483_d86494672c Photo by 88rabbit

4. The Blue Hole, Belize

This submarine cave is legendary. If you’re a diver, you’re not leaving Belize without diving the Great Blue Hole. From the air, the round patch of dark blue waters surrounded by shallow turquoise sea looks unbelievable. It was formed when the roof of a limestone cave system collapsed during the ice age. A natural phenomenon as it is,  submerging as deep as 45m amongst stalactites is wild. Warning – not for beginners!

3874494828_527843c581 Photo by MFS

5. Red Sea, Egypt

A hot favorite among Europeans, the Egyptian Red Sea is easy and cheap to get to from Europe. Bursting with a proliferate marine life, the Red Sea is also littered with hundreds of ship wreck sites such as those at Sha’ab Abu Nuhas and Ras Mohammed. For affordable diving, this is the place to go.

51521845_204bf6855b Photo by Tom Weilenmann

6. The Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea

In the coral triangle bordered by the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, marine biodiversity is at its best – with over 800 marine species identified in just one single area. For expert divers, the Bismarck Sea offers superb diving with micro-marine animals. Interesting creatures like the squat lobsters, sponge crabs, dwarf scorpion fish and pygmy seahorses can be found here.

46436756_5e5fcafd38 Photo by Tom Gruber

7. Sipadan, Borneo

Another favorite of mine, Sipadan wins my vote as the most well-preserved dive destination bursting with a variety of marine creatures and a sprawling coral garden. Visitors are not allowed to stay overnight on the island, so interference is kept to a minimum. The hanging gardens breeding below the island plunge deep into the endless depth, attracting schools of barracuda, hawksbill turtles and horse-eye jacks with aquatic plants.

IMG_3380

8. Taveuni, Fiji

Nicknamed the Garden Island, Taveuni is known for its colorful soft coral gardens that sprawl across the Somosomo Straits. Its highly popular Rainbow Reef and the Great White Wall were voted by U.S. Divers Magazine as one of the top dive sites in the world. Here, expect to find big pelagic fish as well as torpedoes of barracudas, reef sharks and manta rays.

Taveuni-underwater-diving-beginners Fijiphotos.net

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10 Unique Transport Modes Around the World http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/02/25/around-the-world-on-10-unique-transport-modes/ http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/02/25/around-the-world-on-10-unique-transport-modes/#comments Thu, 25 Feb 2010 13:14:59 +0000 http://www.wildjunket.com/2010/02/25/around-the-world-on-10-unique-transport-modes/ 1932225812_f334da2fb5_b.jpgSailing on an ancient junk boat in Vietnam, riding a rickshaw in Japan or seeing the pyramids on camels – there are thousands of strange and oddly intriguing forms of transportation around the world. Inspired by my hero Charley Boorman who travelled from Ireland to Sydney using 112 modes of transport on TV series ‘By Any [...]

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Sailing on an ancient junk boat in Vietnam, riding a rickshaw in Japan or seeing the pyramids on camels – there are thousands of strange and oddly intriguing forms of transportation around the world. Inspired by my hero Charley Boorman who travelled from Ireland to Sydney using 112 modes of transport on TV series ‘By Any Means’, I’m piecing a post together on the 10 most unique transportation means.

1. Bamboo Train, Cambodia

Between Battambang and Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh, you’ll find this interesting train, cobbled together with a wooden frame, bamboo planking, an upright engine and reused military tank wheels. As basic it looks, it can haul passengers and cargo from one city to the next. Known as ‘norry’ in Khmer, it uses the spur lines, which means when a real train comes puffing, get ready to jump off your ride!

3078954403_3323e2ee7f_b Photo by el Floz

2. Tuktuk, India

These motorized three-wheelers are used all over Asia – originally from Thailand, they then spread to Laos, Cambodia, Pakistan and India. Although Bangkok is the pioneer in the tuktuk industry, it’s India where traffic-swerving drivers and chaotic road conditions make it a thrilling ride. Whether you are looking for good food in Bangalore or going shopping in New Delhi, hop on for some fun. A tuktuk can usually accommodation two persons and a suitcase.

Tuktuks in IndiaPhoto by nakwoodford

3. Junk Boat, Hongkong

Along Hongkong’s Victoria Harbour, the nation’s signature junk boats float against a backdrop of skyscraping offices. These Chinese sailboats date from ancient times, specifically the Han Dynasty. Today, they are converted into sunset boats and booze cruises for tourists and locals seeking a breathe of fresh air.

Hongkong junk boat Photo by avlxyz

4. Elephant Trekking, Thailand

Before Phuket was developed into a tourist hub, wild elephants used to roam its dense forests and rolling hills. Today, their numbers are dwindling. Instead of lounging by the beach all day, travelers can explore the area inland on elephant tours.

These elephant trekking tours offer a much-needed lift to the tourism industry, and generate the funds to assure the survival of thousands of elephants in a dignified manner. Be sure to go with ethnical operators who ensure the elephants are well taken care of.

5. Zorb, New Zealand

The zorb is the sport of rolling down a hill inside a giant inflatable ball, cushioned by a thick layer of air. New Zealand first brought us bungee-jumping, white-water raftin, skydiving and now this! There’s a range of rides to choose from – from wet to dry, individual to multi-person or zigzag rides. As the kiwis call it, globe riding sure is an interesting way to find your way round New Zealand.

New Zealand adventure

6. Dog Sleds, Norway

There aren’t many places where you can do this. In Northern Norway, close to the Arctic Circle, you can embark on dog-sledding trips that bring you through gorgeous winter landscapes. Every participant will lead your own team of four or six dogs, and swish across scenic routes. Many trips are organized in the Saltfjellet – Svartisen national park and Jotunheimen National Park, where overnight stays in wooden lodges can be included.

Dogsledding in Norway Photo by De Kleine

7. Totora Boat, Peru

On the floating islands of Lake Titicaca, the Uros tribes weave their homes and transportation with reeds – or totora in their tribal language – found in the lake. Built to resemble the shape of a dragon, it is said that the boats were used to ward off evil in ancient Inca times. These incredibly light but resistant boats sail out swiftly on the calm lake, making transport for the locals easy and convenient.

A totora boat

8. Chicken Bus, Guatemala

Guatemala’s public buses are nicknamed the ‘chicken buses’ for the hectic and tight conditions where  passengers are crammed into these old U.S. school buses alongside chicken and goats. For the intrepid travelers seeking a little adventure, it’s quite an interesting way to get under the skin of the country. Some chicken buses are decked out in neon signs or voodoo posters, but all pose the same thrill. Be warned – petty crimes have been reported on these buses.

A chicken bus in Antigua

9. Felucca, Egypt

These traditional Egyptian sailboats have remained, over the centuries, the primary transportation of the Nile River in Egypt. Its ancient form still graces the river as it has done since the time of the Pharaohs.

These days, both locals and foreigners enjoy a relaxing ride on the felucca, basking under the sun or catching the sunset. Travelers can also take a multi-day felucca ride from Luxor to Aswan and back.

10. Camel back, Jordan

Riding on a camelback through the red-rose deserts of Wadi Rum is one of the highlights of Jordan. Since ancient times, camels have always been the one of the most useful transport tools in the Jordanian history. Travelers can go on a 3-day camel safari trip that includes camping with Bedouins and exploring archaeological sites.

A bedouin on his camel in Wadi Rum

 


Sare with us your experience below:  Have you tried any of these transportations? Are there any other transport mode that you’ve been on?

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Your Wildest Adventure: Cycling a Continent http://www.wildjunket.com/2009/11/02/your-wildest-adventure-cycling-a-continent/ http://www.wildjunket.com/2009/11/02/your-wildest-adventure-cycling-a-continent/#comments Mon, 02 Nov 2009 13:33:42 +0000 http://www.wildjunket.com/2009/11/02/your-wildest-adventure-cycling-a-continent/ EthiopiaI’m starting a new series on ‘Your Wildest Adventure’ where fellow travel writers gather here to share insightful tales on their craziest jaunt around the world. To kick off the series, Dave & Deb at The Planet D brings us on their once-in-a-lifetime journey of cycling a continent.   Cycling A Continent It all started [...]

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I’m starting a new series on ‘Your Wildest Adventure’ where fellow travel writers gather here to share insightful tales on their craziest jaunt around the world. To kick off the series, Dave & Deb at The Planet D brings us on their once-in-a-lifetime journey of cycling a continent.

Ethiopia

  Cycling A Continent

It all started with a glass of wine on a rainy New Years Eve. We had come home early from visiting my parents in Florida and felt that it was time for another adventure.

We needed to take off and be free again. But what could we do to make a drastic and dramatic impact? We didn’t want to just simply go backpacking again. We wanted to do something extraordinary.

As we discussed how unfulfilled we were with our lives an interview caught our attention on the CBC. They were talking with Ultra Marathon runner Ray Zahab. He was the original inspiration for the wildest adventure of our life. Ray Zahab had competed in and won many ultra marathons such as the Marathon des Sables and the Yukon Ultra as well as starring in the 2007 documentary “Running the Sahara” which was produced by Matt Damon.

Dave and Deb in Namibia

Tour d’Afrique

By the time we went to bed our mind was made up and we decided that by the next New Years Eve we were going to be on the adventure of a lifetime.

It was only two weeks after that night that we spotted an article in the paper about a man that was taking part in that years Tour d’Afrique. It is an insane bicycle race that starts in Cairo, Egypt and ends in Cape Town South Africa.

We joined a spinning gym and started our training for the world’s longest and most grueling cycling race. We informed our friends, families and our employers that we were leaving and before we knew it, the time had come.

Racing Off in Cairo

One year later we were on a plane to Egypt. We had been cycling an average of 400km per week and we had been weight training and endurance training all year. But nothing could prepare us for the physical challenges that lay ahead. We would be traveling through some of the toughest terrains on the planet cycling on average 120 km per day for 120 days.

leaving pyramids

It was a cold morning in January when we left in a pack from the Great Pyramids of Giza. 60 people from 23 countries had come together to ride through a continent. We caused quite a stir that day. Half of Cairo’s police force was out to escort us through the city. They stopped traffic and people cheered as we passed. We felt like major celebrities in our convoy as we worked our way through the maze of this enormous urban centre. I imagined that this is what it must feel like to compete in the Tour de France.

It was surreal at times to say the least. In Egypt and the Sudan, we had armed guards following us through our route. Random trucks would pull up in front of us with their machine guns aimed in our direction. They would smile and wave and we would hold our breath and pray that their hand wouldn’t slip or that their truck wouldn’t hit a bump.

New Challenges Each Day

Each day brought on a new challenge and adventure. In Egypt we had to dodge speeding busses and hectic traffic. In the Sudan we dealt with deep desert sand and unbearable heat. Tanzania and Malawi brought on epic climbs and awesome descents. We survived being chased by wild packs of dogs and even baboons. We were lost in the desert and shared or roads with herds of cattle and donkeys. But nothing compared to having children throw rocks at our heads with perfect aim during our entire 23 days in Ethiopia. It was a wild adventure to say the least.

Sudan

As time went on, things became easier however. The roads got better the farther south we cycled and the children in the southern countries didn’t have the same affection to rock throwing as they did in Ethiopia.

We camped our way down the continent meeting new people and seeing awe-inspiring sights like Victoria Falls, Mount Kilimanjaro and Fish River Canyon. We witnessed the beauty of the wild Africa. We slept under the stars surrounded by nothing but nature and we lived a life of simplicity for four months. As grueling and difficult as it was, there was something beautiful about waking up each day and knowing exactly what you had to do. There was only one goal and that was to make it to camp as fast as you could.

our home

Cycling Africa pushed us to our physical and mental limits and after conquering 12,000 km on the seat of a bicycle we have learned that anything is possible.

Ending the Race in Cape Town

Deb, Womens Champ Riding into Cape Town on our final day in May brought a sense of pride and personal achievement. A huge crowd greeted us at the V&A Waterfront and we were even rewarded for our efforts. I had won the women’s race and Dave was awarded the prestigious EFI (every fabulous inch) award. While others went on side trips or took a day off, sat on the bus or fell ill, Dave pushed through sickness and fatigue to ride every single kilometre of the tour.

Our time in Africa had come to an end, but a spark had been lit inside of us. This was only the beginning, a whole new world of possibilities had opened up and we couldn’t wait to plan the next adventure.

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image Dave and Deb are Canada’s Adventure Couple. They have traveled to over 30 countries on 5 continents. From climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania to trekking to the Pinnacles of Borneo, they are always searching for new and exciting ways to explore the world.

Follow them at ThePlanetD for their next adventure through Central Asia where they will be trekking the Himalaya’s, horseback riding through Mongolia and learning Yoga in India. You can also track their adventures on twitter @theplanetd

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Roaming the deserts of Egypt & Jordan http://www.wildjunket.com/2008/05/17/roaming-the-deserts-of-egypt-jordan/ http://www.wildjunket.com/2008/05/17/roaming-the-deserts-of-egypt-jordan/#comments Sat, 17 May 2008 09:07:00 +0000 http://www.wildjunket.com/?p=577 White Desert in Bahariya, EgyptA few snapshots from our time in the White Desert, Egypt, and Wadi Rum, Jordan. Entering the Bahariya Oasis of the Western Desert, Egypt The White Desert Setting up camp in the middle of the desert. Breakfast on the sand.   Our campground in Wadi Rum, Jordan  Bedouins roaming the desert on their camels. The [...]

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A few snapshots from our time in the White Desert, Egypt, and Wadi Rum, Jordan.

White Desert in Bahariya, Egypt

Entering the Bahariya Oasis of the Western Desert, Egypt

The White Desert
Setting up camp in the middle of the desert.
Breakfast on the sand.

 

Our campground in Wadi Rum, Jordan

 Bedouins roaming the desert on their camels.

The Bedouin family we met in the heart of the desert,who made us tea and welcomed us with open arms.

Sand dunes!

our guide

on the bridge in the desert

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