The Welsh Showdown: Bushcrafting

Posted on September 3, 2010 by

It’s not everyday I find myself bushcrafting in the middle of the Gower Forest in South Wales but there I was – with nothing but two chunks of wood – attempting to start a fire the way prehistoric men did.  We are on our next challenge of the Welsh Showdown: the Survival of the Fittest.

This full-day Wilderness Survival Course conducted by Dryad Bushcrafting is aimed at teaching us basic skills and techniques of bushcrafting. So what is bushcrafting?

Andrew Price, the young founder and head instructor of the outfitter, tells us, “Our aim is to teach people how to live in the outdoors and using our environment for sustainable living. It does not require supernatural abilities, but a practical understanding of the basic principles and techniques of bushcraft that will enable you to adapt confidently to any environment.”

Our Bushcrafting site in Gower Woods

Dryad Bushcraft was started a few years ago with funding from the Welsh assembly sustainable development fund. Activities include fire lighting, fungi forage, primitive and modern traps and tracking techniques and many other subjects.

Man vs. Wild

Instructor Rick at Bushcrafting CourseEarlier that morning, we had driven towards Swansea, Southwest Wales to get to Gower. This particular part of Southwest Wales was designated Britain’s first area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB) on the 9th of May 1956.

We started our day off with a stop at the Gower Heritage Center and a Neolithic period burial ground. After catching a glimpse into the rural Welsh lifestyle, we headed out into the woods, geared for some ‘Man vs Wild’ action.

Foraging through the thick foliage of the Gower Woods, we chance upon raspberries, meadowsweets and willow plants. Rick, our instructor, plucks a thorny leaf and chucks it into his mouth. Surprisingly, his tongue remains unscath. As we thread through the forest, Rick explains the use of each plant and how some can serve as medication or just to fill our stomachs.

 wild berries in Gower forest

Making Fire From Scratch

tn_IMG_0631After a series of explanations and demonstrations, we are presented with our first task: making fire with two sticks of wood. With my knee pressed against a slab of wood, I summon up strength to rub another slice of wood against it like a saw. Teamwork plays an important factor here, as our team of three emerge as the winner with our combined efforts.

Bushcraft is not a spectator sport. The emphasis is on hands-on practice and working together as a  team. As you can see, team work makes every single thing you do easier and more enjoyable.” Andrew explains the aim of his bushcraft courses.

 

bushcrafting in Wales

Next, we are tasked to build our own makeshift shelter using natural elements in our environment. Logs of wood and short branches are gathered and the construction begins. As a group, we discuss the basic structure of our shelter and how we would stack the logs together. Soon we are piling up wood, dried leaves and hay.

A makeshift sheter

At the end of the day, we have adapted to the natural environment and become modern-day survivors. Perhaps I wouldn’t have won without the help of my team members, but I sure have learned a ton of essential knowledge in this adventure.

Stay tuned to my updates over the next few days and leave some comments to help me win the challenge! The blogger with the most number of comments wins the challenge.

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About Nellie Huang

Nellie Huang is the co-founder of WildJunket. As a professional travel writer with a special interest in offgrid destinations and adventure travel, she scours through the world in search for a slice of undiscovered paradise. In her quest, she's climbed an active volcano in Guatemala, swam with sealions in the Galapagos and built a school in Tanzania.

12 Responses to “The Welsh Showdown: Bushcrafting”

  1. Dudu September 3, 2010 3:13 pm #

    That looks like so much fun!

  2. Melvin September 3, 2010 5:38 pm #

    That would be fun to attend! Sounds great!

  3. Melvin September 3, 2010 5:40 pm #

    As a kid I built many huts in the woods… eat berries & just enjoyed the nature!

  4. Marina K. Villatoro September 4, 2010 12:08 am #

    That looks like something my husband would love! He loves adventure and nature.

  5. Victoria Rodriguez September 5, 2010 2:06 am #

    Amazing ! All the things Nature can teach us! Good for you and thank you for sharing this hands-on experience with us. Saludos !

    • Nellie September 7, 2010 1:21 am #

      Thanks Victoria for dropping by! Bushcrafting was quite an eye-opener, I really did learn how to survive in the wilderness using elements of nature. It wld be interesting to see courses like that in Argentina too. ;)

  6. Ron September 5, 2010 3:19 am #

    Troughout my current lifespan I have learned many bush skills, including survival skills, mostly here in British Columbia. There have been many other environments around the world where I have had learning experiences, but had never considered gaining such in GB environs. Thanks for the wake-up on the Welsh venture. It never hurts to learn about new variations.

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